Recipe Details

Grilled Pork Pie

Prep Time: 1 hour
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Servings: 8

FOR ROASTS, CHOPS and TENDERLOINS

Cook to 145 F with 3 minute rest

Ingredients


Dough:

2 sticks butter
2 1/2 cups flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup cold water

Soaking Sauce:

1/2 cup white vinegar
1/2 cup cola
1/2 cup ketchup
2 tablespoons brown sugar
2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon molasses
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 teaspoon hot pepper sauce
3/4 pound barbecued pork, chopped

Cooking Directions

Cut butter into 1/2 inch cubes; refrigerate. In small mixing bowl combine flour and salt. Add in cold butter until mixture resembles coarse bread crumbs. Slowly add water, mixing continuously, until a dough ball is formed. Seal dough ball in cling wrap; place in refrigerator overnight.

Sprinkle countertop generously with flour. On floured area, roll out dough to a thickness of 1/8-inch. Cut dough into five-inch diameter circles. Immediately peel, lift and flip dough circles, making sure they don’t stick. Yield should be eight pie shells.

In small sauce pan, combine soaking sauce ingredients. Bring sauce to a light boil; reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes. Remove sauce from heat and set aside.

Preheat grill using Kingsford charcoal, until internal temperature reaches 400°F.

Combine chopped pork and 1/2 cup of soaking sauce in medium bowl. Spread three tablespoons of sauced pork onto one-half of each dough circle, making sure outer edge of the shell is uncovered. Lightly moisten edges of dough with water. Fold dough in half creating a half-moon with filling. Gently press pie edges together and crimp with a fork.

Prep the charcoal grill grate with a grill brush and a light coat of oil. Transfer pies to the grill and cook at 400 degrees Fahrenheit over direct heat for two to three minutes on each side, or until dough turns a crispy golden brown. Remove from grill and serve with remaining soaking sauce and coleslaw.
Serves 8

Serving Suggestions

Recipe created by world champion pitmaster Chris Lilly on behalf of Kingsford® charcoal. For more, visit www.Grilling.com

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About the Cut: Shoulder

Pork shoulder is the top portion of the front leg of the hog. The terminology for pork shoulder can vary widely depending on the region. However, the lower ‘arm’ portion of the shoulder is most commonly called the arm picnic. The upper part of the shoulder, often called the Boston blade roast (also known as Boston- style butt), comes from the area near the loin and contains the shoulder blade bone.


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About the Cooking Method: Grilling

There are two ways to grill pork based on the size of the cut:

  • Direct heat, where food is placed directly over the heat source, is ideal for small cuts like kabobs, tenderloin, burgers and chops.
  • Indirect heat, where food is placed on the grill rack away from the coals or gas burners, is good for large cuts like loin roasts, ribs, shoulder and fresh ham.

COOKING BASICS:
Direct Heat

Arrange hot coals evenly on the fire grate of the grill or use all gas burners. Place pork directly above the heat source. Follow suggested cooking times, turning once during cooking.

Indirect Heat

Bank hot coals on both sides of the fire grate, on one side of the grill or in a ring around the perimeter. For gas grills, pre-heat and then turn off any burners directly below where the food will go. Place pork on the grill so it is not directly over any coals or gas burners and close grill hood. Follow suggested cooking times until pork is done. The heat circulates inside the grill, so turning the pork is not necessary.


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Tips and Tricks

Buying, Handling & Storage Tips

It is safe to cook frozen or partially-frozen pork in the oven, on the stove or grill without defrosting it first; the cooking time may be about 50% longer. Use a meat thermometer to check for doneness. It is best if frozen pork roasts are cooked at an oven temperature of 325 degrees F. Do not cook frozen pork in a slow cooker.


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Butcher's Tips

To ensure doneness, check with a meat thermometer. A thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the cut should produce a temperature of 160°F for medium doneness


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