Recipe Details

Pan-Seared Chops with Pear and Soy-Ginger Glaze

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Servings: 4

FOR ROASTS, CHOPS and TENDERLOINS

Cook to 145 F with 3 minute rest

Ingredients

4 bone-in ribeye (rib) pork chops, about 3/4-inch thick
1/2 cup flour
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon black pepper, freshly ground
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil

Pear Glaze:

1/3 cup pear nectar, plus 2 tablespoons
1/2 cup brown sugar, packed
3 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
1 tablespoon fresh ginger root, grated
1/4 teaspoon cayenne
4 firm and ripe Anjou pears, peeled, halved lengthwise, cored, and cut into 1/2-inch wedges
2 teaspoons cornstarch

Cooking Directions

To make glaze, bring pear nectar to simmer in large, non-stick skillet over medium-high heat. Add sugar, soy sauce, vinegar, ginger root, and cayenne. Stir until sugar is dissolved and sauce begins to simmer. Add pears and stir to coat. Cook, basting pears frequently, until pears are barely tender, 4 minutes. Mix remaining 2 tablespoons of pear nectar with cornstarch and stir into pear mixture. Simmer until sauce thickens slightly. Transfer to bowl and set aside. Wipe out skillet.

Combine flour, thyme, pepper, and salt on plate. Dredge chops in flour mixture, coating all sides and shaking off excess.

Using same pan, heat olive oil over medium-high heat and swirl to coat pan. Add pork chops and brown on each side, turning once, about 3 minutes per side. Turn heat to low and pour pear mixture over top, cover, and cook until chops and internal temperature on a thermometer reads 145 degrees F and pears are tender, about 5 minutes. Let rest 3 minutes and then serve.

Serves 4.

Serving Suggestions

This one-skillet dish is a perfect pairing of pork and braised fruit, especially with a hint of soy sauce and a touch of cayenne. Three apples, such as Golden Delicious, could be substituted for the pears. If you wanted to serve this to company, you could make the pear glaze 1 to 2 days ahead and refrigerate it. Warm the glaze before adding to the chops in the pan.

Nutrition Information

Calories: 441 calories
Protein: 21 grams
Fat: 10 grams
Sodium: 600 milligrams
Cholesterol: 50 milligrams
Saturated Fat: 2 grams
Carbohydrates: 73 grams
Fiber: 7 grams

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About the Cut: Chop

Pork chops are the most popular cut from the pork loin, which is the strip of meat that runs from the pig’s hip to shoulder. Depending on where they originate, pork chops can be found under a variety of names, including loin, rib, sirloin, top loin and blade chops.

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About the Cooking Method: Braising

COOKING BASICS:
1. Coat meat lightly with seasoned flour, if desired.
2. In a large, heavy pan with lid, brown meat on all sides in a small amount of oil; remove excess drippings from pan.
3. Cover meat with desired liquid(s).
4. Cover pan and simmer over low heat on stove or in a low to moderate (275 to 300 degrees F.) oven for 1 to 3 hours, until tender.
5. If adding vegetables, add toward end of cooking time, during the last 20 to 45 minutes.

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Tips and Tricks

Buying, Handling & Storage Tips

The best way to defrost pork is in the refrigerator in its wrapping. Defrosting a 1 inch chop will take 12-14 hours.


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Butcher's Tips

It’s important to note that all pork chops cook the same. The length of cooking primarily depends on the thickness of the chop. Thickness can vary from ½ to 2 inches. Whether you choose chops boneless for convenience or chops with the bone attached for their attractive appearance, the cooking time is the same. Pork chops are likely the least intimidating of all pork cuts because they are so easy to prepare.

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